A male person in black shirt and khaki gilet operating a studio camera. BA Hons Film Production.
UCAS Code
PP31
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years Full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2022
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Our ScreenSkills Select-accredited BA (Hons) Film Production degree will mould you into the expert filmmaker, cinematographer, editor, and special effects producer the booming film industry craves. 

Master the practical and business elements of film creation and exhibit your films at national screening events, which will turn employers’ heads your way.

Graduates have created indie films, joined Marvel, Maverick and Pinewood Studios, and worked on critically acclaimed titles Black Mirror, Wonder Woman 1984, and No Time to Die. Here’s your chance to follow in their footsteps.

Course highlights

  • Familiarise yourself with advanced professional equipment used in the industries – including Arri Alexa cinema camera systems, a Pro Tools-equipped Foley and ADR sound studio, and a Baselight colour grading system
  • Attract potential employers by showcasing your films at our annual screening event at London’s British Film Institute (BFI)
  • Boost your professional experience by taking an optional one-year placement – either with a company or by setting up your own
  • Bolster your practice and knowledge by attending specialist masterclasses and workshops on all areas of film production
  • Show your editing expertise to industry peers by gaining an Avid Media Composer certification
  • Enhance your employability by accessing training events, bursaries and scholarships – one of many advantages of a ScreenSkills Select accreditation

95% of graduates in work or further study 15 months after this course (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey 2018/19)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework
ScreenSkills Select logo in crimson

Accreditation

This course is accredited by ScreenSkills Select, a professional body for the screen industry.

All ScreenSkills Select-accredited courses must show the highest level of quality and relevance to the industry. This ensures you'll learn the knowledge and skills relevant to your future career and assures potential employers that your degree is relevant to the screen industry. This accreditation also gives you access to exclusive benefits such as employability training events, scholarships and bursaries.

Watch our BA (Hons) Film Production Graduate Show 2021 showreel
Class of 2021

Watch snippets of the best film projects and shorts from our 2021 final-year Film Production students.

Entry requirements​

BA (Hons) Film Production

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBB
  • UCAS points – 120–128 points from A levels or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM
  • International Baccalaureate – 29

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

Selection process

A relevant qualification or experience in film/video is required. Applicants without relevant qualifications may be asked to submit a digital portfolio.

For more information on how to put together a portfolio, read our Film Production creative portfolio guide.

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

" I've really enjoyed my journey in film production at the University of Portsmouth. Starting here in the UK has given me another angle to know this world. "

Kunwen Chen, BA (Hons) Film Production 2021 graduate

Read Kunwen's story

Facilities and specialist kit

Television broadcasting hub

CCIXR

Create stunning works for film, TV, music, gaming and immersive reality in the UK's first integrated facility of its kind.

Explore CCIXR

Two men fighting with mocap suit and VR headset

Motion Capture Studio

Our studio is decked with all you need for visual effects, gaming and other virtual productions.

Explore Studio 

A person using a sound system with condenser microphone

Eldon Sound Recording Studio

Record all your voice work in our soundproof booth, featuring a Sonifex portable radio production unit and audio recording software such as Audacity and Adobe Audition.

Explore studio 

A close-up of an Arri camera

Industry TV and cinema cameras

Shoot high-quality footage with Sony x70, FS5 and FS7 cameras, and Arri Alexa Cinema systems: the platinum standard among professional cinematographers. 

A close-up of sound faders

Avid Editing Suite

Award-winning kit for future award-winning filmmakers. Our suite includes non-linear editing software Avid Media Composer and specialist Avid hardware for efficient film editing. 

A colour grading system control deck

Baselight Colour Grading Studio

Bring photorealistic vividness to your footage. Our studio features a multi-control deck and the innovative Base Grade grading tool for striking true-colour development. 

Careers and opportunities

You'll have plenty of career routes when you finish this course. Many of our graduates have found success in a variety of roles, destinations and productions – with some going on to work on the sets of blockbuster films and award-winning TV series.

Others have also been nationally recognised in the film and TV industry. For example, a team of our graduates won a Royal Television Society (RTS) award in 2020 for Best Student Film.

Graduate roles

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • runner
  • camera assistant
  • junior/editing assistant
  • sound recordist
  • junior researcher
  • personal or production assistant
  • junior/production coordinator
  • second/third assistant director

Graduate destinations

Companies and studios our graduates have worked in include:

  • Walt Disney
  • Maverick
  • Marvel
  • Outpost facilities, Pinewood Studios
  • BBC
  • ITV
  • NBC Universal

Film and TV work

Graduates have worked on commercial and indie titles such as:

  • Wonder Woman 1984
  • Rocketman
  • No Time To Die
  • The Batman
  • Bridgerton
  • Bohemian Rhapsody
  • Black Mirror  
  • Boiling Point (indie film)
  • Villain (indie film)

Featured podcast: Shifra Kirby

Alumna Shifra Kirby initially planned to work in law but changed her mind at the last minute for film production. In 2018, three months after graduating, she secured a dream role doing something completely different to what she envisaged just a few years ago. Listen to Shifra's journey to a creative career she loves.

Ongoing careers support

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience. You can also venture into freelancing, or set up and run your own business with help from the University Startup Team.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

Placement year (optional)

Want to gain some valuable industry experience and increase your employment potential when you graduate? By doing a work placement between your second and third year, you can do exactly that.

You can work for a company or organisation, or set up and run your own business – either with peers or on your own. No matter what you choose, you can get full support from our Creative Careers team.

Creative Careers

Our in-faculty Creative Careers team has extensive recruitment experience and knows the creative sector well, making it easier for students to find placements within the creative industries.

They can guide you through every step of the application process, including:

  • Searching for the ideal job through their database of vacancies
  • Giving tips on how to write an interesting CV that will catch employers' attention, no matter the role
  • Organising mock interviews, so you can hone your technique and familiarise yourself with the recruitment environment
  • Writing your startup business proposal – if you're going down the self-employment route

The team will continue to give you support throughout your placement year.

Placement roles

Former students have interned in various roles, including:

  • Video Producer
  • Editor Assistant
  • Creative Intern
  • Creative Producer
  • Communications Coordinator
  • Promotions Assistant
  • Post-Production Runner

Placement destinations

They've completed their placements either self-employed or with well-known names, including:

  • Walt Disney
  • The Farm
  • NBC Universal
  • Warner Media
  • Vivid Homes
  • Fifty Fifty Post-Production
  • University of Portsmouth

" I enjoyed applying my existing skills to a role I'd never tried before because it allowed me to acquire a better insight into what the marketing industry might be like, and it even made me consider marketing in the film industry as a potential backup career choice."

Cristian Ionut Necula, BA (Hons) Film Production 2021 graduate

Read Cristian's story

​What you'll study

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll study fiction and non-fiction experimental films and critique production modes, structural strategies, and aesthetic approaches.

You'll develop skills in research, concept development, pre-production planning, production techniques and professional practices and work in groups to produce 2 short film.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify, collect and deploy ideas related to storytelling modes within fiction and non-fiction experimental films
  • Plan, produce and present a group short film in response to a brief
  • Manage a film production, working effectively as a team
  • Assess, reflect and discuss your own production process and artefacts
  • Recognise, apply and review skills to a professional industry standard
  • Analyse the construction of film
Teaching activities
  • 13 hours of lectures
  • 22 hours of seminars
  • 18 hours of tutorial
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 347 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute film (30% of final mark) – in response to brief
  • a 5-minute film (30% of final mark) – in response to brief
  • a 1,500-word film analysis (20% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Differentiate between the use and application of different editing software platforms
  • Demonstrate understanding and application of basic editing skills with Avid MC
  • Interpret and apply key concepts of digital media management storage and techniques
  • Recognise the application of industry practice on any given project
  • Define the use of particular editing techniques in film and television products
  • Interpret the historical and theoretical use of editing techniques
Teaching activities
  • 16 x 1-hour lectures
  • 18 x 1.5-hour computer workshops

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 147 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour examination (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour practical skills assessment (60% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to outline laws, professional codes of conduct and moral philosophical positions that may relate to creative media production practices, film and TV production and broadcast/exhibition
  • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of produced work with reflective reviews and evaluation
  • Identify and demonstrate the student's own skills, interests and motivations in the context of career decision making
  • Explore the options, both locally and globally, open to students and identify the specific skills and qualities required in broad fields of creative technology industries
  • Evaluate how a student's skills, personal priorities and constraints may affect career decisions and to formulate the action, including the development of new skills, needed to achieve career goals
  • Recognise, identify and develop a professional online presence using and applying appropriate technology to create an effective online portfolio, blog, and CV
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and fieldwork.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to create work using digital filming technology, including professional cameras, location sound recorders, microphones and digital editing software
  • Recognise and utilise the film grammar of audio-visual communication
  • Demonstrate skills in single-camera production techniques and processes
  • Demonstrate the ability to project manage film productions and communicate ideas effectively
  • Recognise, define and explore the roles, responsibilities and procedures involved in effective single-camera production team-working
  • Identify and implement health and safety, welfare and compliance issues associated with film production practice
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes, lectures and project supervision.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 146 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (5% of final mark) – multiple choice exam to test camera and sound skills
  • info film (35% of final mark) – small group production of a 3-5 minute informative, accurate, creative and professional broadcast quality instructional film
  • opening sequence film (40% of final mark) – small group production of an opening title sequence (1-2mins), conforming to a specific brief
  • production pack (20% of final mark) – in conjunction with Opening Sequence Submission, each group is required to submit one Production Pack comprising of: a film folder, shot rationale, individual reflections and peer reviews

What you'll do

On this module, you'll explore the above key questions about cinema by examining a selection of historical and contemporary examples of cinematic approaches from mainstream Hollywood, independent, European and transnational cinema.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and describe key theoretical concepts around film language, representation and spectatorship
  • Debate major debates in film practice and theory around issues of representation, through the discussion of specific films and their academic critiques
  • Compare and contrast different cinematic approaches from a range of production contexts and identify the ways they create meaning
  • Demonstrate basic analysis skills in relation to specific examples of filmmaking.
Teaching activities
  • a 1-hour practical class
  • a 1-hour tutorial
  • 66 hours of lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 138 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework assignment (25% of the final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (25% of the final mark)
  • a coursework (50% of the final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll study story and script development, scheduling, budgeting, health and safety, funding and the international marketplace. You'll also learn how to conceive, develop, pitch, package and produce shows across genres.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and implement editorial and financial strategies for international TV and film production
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the national and international marketplace
  • Present and pitch ideas appropriate for a range of existing and emerging broadcasters and platforms, through a globally aware company or outlet for international TV/film production
  • Formulate and demonstrate awareness of international production roles and the global production marketplace
  • Demonstrate and apply an awareness of health and safety procedures and an ability to prepare and process production documents
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a report (20% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour practical exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a coursework portfolio (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret, analyse and explain aesthetic, thematic, political and economic concerns of transnational films and filmmakers
  • Apply key theoretical reading to analysis of films
  • Critically assess how new technologies, production and exhibition contexts impact on national and transnational filmmaking
  • Evaluate the relationship of film to wider geo-political agendas and concerns
  • Critically understand and articulate distribution, marketing and reception of transnational work
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 37 hours of seminars (including film screenings)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 139 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a quiz (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word assignment (70% of final mark) – in this assignment you'll design a website

Optional modules

This module combines the Work Placement and Self Employed Placement, so you can alternate between shorter periods of an industrial placement or start-up experience.

What you'll do and learn

With the support of the Creative Careers team, you can find, apply for and complete a year of a work placement with a variety of employers - previous placements have been offered from NBC, Disney, Warner Bros. and a variety of SME's in the region.

Teaching activities

You'll be offered supervisor visits (online, by phone or in person) to support your experience in the workplace.

Assessment

You'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of your final mark).

 

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within self-employment, freelancing or business start-ups
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within your chosen area of employment
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and use the grammar of film language required in the practice of single-camera production and cinematic filming
  • Develop and apply advanced standard operating skills, technical competency and aesthetic judgement related to single-camera production practices and cinematographic techniques
  • Identify and assess key roles, responsibilities and procedures involved in effective TV and Film production team working
  • Identify and implement health and safety, welfare and compliance issues associated with television production practice
  • Identify and review how technical experimentation, application, creativity and aesthetics can enhance the story form, and challenge its conventions and techniques
  • Recognise and develop skills in single-camera production operating techniques and processes
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 142 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • coursework (35% of final mark)
  • an examination (5% of final mark)
  • practical assessment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at how you can use music and effects to strengthen and underpin narrative modes, affect story telling, and influence viewer engagement. You'll produce a music-based video artefact using the skills you learn.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to make informed creative choices relating to music and visual effects as applied to film and TV production
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to , cut and manipulate music and audio FX, using AVID editing software
  • Show an understanding of the practices and principles of making a music-based video production
  • Apply and manipulate visual effects using AVID editing and AfterFX software
  • Interpret and demonstrate an understanding of the conventions, historical development and theoretical concepts of music and visual effects in relation to TV and film
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes, lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a practical skills assessment (20% of final mark) – Observed supervised work session (Individual)
  • project output (60% of final mark) – 10-15 minute verbal pitch and 3-5 minute music based film/video, Group submission

What you'll do

You'll learn about the casting process and how to get the best out of actors when on set, in rehearsal and production.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate effective casting processes and protocols for direction for the screen
  • Reflect on how the rehearsal process impacts directorial process
  • Direct actors/social actors in performances for the screen
  • Apply the appropriate communication, film language and methodology of directing actors
  • Create a short filmed sequence, using appropriate directing techniques for actors and crew
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and seminars.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 169 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a practical skills assessment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore approaches to concept, production management, audience and delivery. You'll study how documentary film can challenge, address and explore social, cultural and political issues and questions of representation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a developed and informed understanding of documentary's place within wider cultural contexts, in relation to the social and political world
  • Examine, discuss and deploy personal and technical skills, and visual grammar, appropriate to the documentary genre
  • Examine and discuss the ethical responsibilities of all group members, in all areas of documentary production
  • Present and pitch ideas appropriate for a professional documentary film production
  • Formulate an appropriate marketing strategy, with reference to concepts of audience, outlets and consumption platforms
  • Implement advanced project management techniques to manage specific film productions and communicate ideas effectively
  • Draw on a range of research sources and critically engage with major debates within non-fiction/fiction media and to evaluate your own work and that of your peers, with reference to these issues
  • Understand and demonstrate health and safety, welfare and compliance issues associated with television documentary production practice
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes, seminars, lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently, on your own or in your group. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • project output (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll do this by engaging in interdisciplinary work, developing an appreciation of other creative disciplines and understanding how professionals collaborate.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate independent, analytical and creative attributes
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player, able to provide leadership and to support the success of others
  • Communicate clearly and effectively using various methods and to different audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll work independently and in groups with regular tutorial support, and also attend some briefings and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a group presentation (40% of final mark)
  • an individual portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the practical skills and production techniques, appropriate to client requirements
  • Implement creativity in the client’s marketplace
  • Deliver a finished client product to agreed timescales
  • Demonstrate effective project management in the form of a finished client product to agreed timescales
  • Demonstrate professional project management in the form of research, organisation and reflective analysis of the process
  • Explain appropriate professional relationships and attitudes towards colleagues and clients
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend seminars, lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 161 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute portfolio (70% of final mark)
  • a written essay assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll cover the creative process, from pitching techniques to proposal writing, and create a short film.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Organise a group film production from conception and the commissioning process, to delivery
  • Recognise and identify the codes, conventions and film language of moving images in different contexts and formats, and evaluate your own work in those terms
  • Formulate an appropriate marketing strategy, with reference to concepts of audience, outlets and consumption platforms
  • Evidence and reflect on the ability to project manage all stages of a short film production and communicate ideas effectively
  • Present and pitch ideas appropriate for a specific format, exhibition, festival or other outlet for a one-off short film production
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of project supervision
  • 20 hours of lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 168 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (15% of the final mark)
  • a coursework portfolio (75% of the final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (10% of the final mark)

What you'll do

Study abroad placements are done in year 3 of a 4 year sandwich degree structure. Enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies and develop knowledge and skills essential for roles in the global workforce. Participation in this module is subject to a selection process, supply and demand you'll be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Where activity is to be undertaken in a non-English speaking country, you'l need to evidence your language ability and plans for improving your language competency.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your course within a global context
  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect critically on your personal development during your study abroad, identifying the transferable skills you acquired and their relevance to future study and employability
Teaching activities
  • 5 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 20 hours studying independently. This is around half an hour a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000 portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

Study abroad placements are done in year 2 of a three year degree. Enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies and develop knowledge and skills essential for roles in the global workforce. Participation in this module is subject to a selection process, supply and demand you'll be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Where travelling to a non-English speaking country, you'l need to evidence your language ability and plans for improving your language competency.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your course within a global context
  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect critically on your personal development during your study abroad, identifying the transferable skills you acquired and their relevance to future study and employability
Teaching activities
  • 3 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 20 hours studying independently. This is around 1 hour a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000 portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

You'll enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect on your personal development and how your employability prospects have been enhanced by the exchange
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll also learn location recording techniques, using specialist sound recording equipment.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate and use the grammar of film language that's required in the practice and art of audio acquisition and sound design
  • Develop and apply advanced standard operating skills, technical competency and aesthetic judgements relating to sound design
  • Identify and assess key roles, responsibilities and procedures involved in effective TV and film production team working and processes
  • Identify and review how technical experimentation, application, creativity and aesthetics can enhance the story form and challenge its conventions and techniques
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend supervised workshops, practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 161 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute practical skills assessment (70% of final mark)
  • a practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll use software such as Adobe After Effects and Cinema 4D and look at 2D and 3D compositing, green screen, keying, advanced tracking and other techniques that will help you build convincing visual effect scenes and set extensions in your films. 

Lectures cover shooting for FX, whilst workshops focus on the Post Production methods.

What you’ll learn
  • When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:
  • Apply fundamental compositing skills in After Effects.
  • Develop and show an understanding of the importance of ‘shooting for FX’.
  • Utilise a range of advanced green screen keying techniques.
  • Create and manipulate elements within After Effects.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to use appropriate Post Production workflows for VFX delivery through the Online Editor.
Teaching activities

On this module, you’ll take part in:

  • Practical classes and workshops
  • Timetabled lectures
  • Tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around…10 hours a week over the duration of this module.

Assessment

On this module, you’ll be assessed by:

  • Coursework (60% of final mark)
  • Set exam (40% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify future career goals and reflect on these to develop a personal development plan (programme of learning), which includes suitable work experience and skills/knowledge development opportunities
  • Arrange suitable work experience, engage with personal development opportunities and analyse relevant literature relating to enhancing your employment opportunities
  • Critically evaluate and articulate your learning (knowledge, skills and attributes) in relation to your future career goals
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 188 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word report (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

Elements covered include log-lining, synopsis writing, pitching, proposals, treatments, bibles, drafting screenplays and script editing.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the skills necessary to tell structured, original and international stories
  • Analyse the codes and conventions of various film and TV languages
  • Compare and implement story structures and narrative requirements of global film and TV production
  • Analyse target audiences and profiling projects with regard to emerging platforms and global marketplace requirements
  • Apply the skills to draft, re-draft and develop script-based media to operate successfully in the creative industries
  • Understand script writing and appreciate what an array of acclaimed scripts consistently offer
Teaching activities
  • 22 hours of lectures
  • 22 hours of seminars
  • 8 hours of tutorial
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 146 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour practical assessment (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word practical skills assessment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll form a small group (typically with 4 other students) and work through areas such as designing, manufacturing and pitching ideas. The knowledge and skill you will get through this module will help you to run your own business, but are also transferable skills you can use in many other careers.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on your effectiveness at tasks that use employability skills such as project planning, communication, time management, leadership and teamwork
  • Evaluate the theory and complete the practice of establishing and running a business enterprise
  • Understand the systems commonly used to plan, record and monitor business decisions and company transactions
  • Critically reflect on the factors that contribute towards the success or failure of business start ups
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently (including group work). This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 2,000 word report (50% of your final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of your final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the operation and use of scuba diving equipment
  • Display proficiency in basic diving safety and rescue procedures
  • Understand and apply the physical and physiological principles of diving
  • Plan, organise and conduct safe diving activities appropriate to the circumstances
  • Plan and undertake dives for producing underwater film or photography
  • Use and explain the techniques used in underwater film production and photography
  • Describe and explain the main features of HSE legislation, risk assessment, project reports and the conduct of a diving project, within the Media Approved Codes of Practice
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and practical workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (pass/fail) - PADI Diving Certification
  • project output (100% of final mark) - either a 3-minute micro film or a production file

What you'll do

You'll explore topics including: on-set ingest and logging, storage and media, colour monitoring, preparing for the edit, advanced editing techniques, LUTs, and creative grading and integration.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and apply industry workflows for TV and film production
  • Describe and analyse current trends in post production
  • Design an editing workflow and colour pipeline for a specific camera
  • Apply key theoretical and technical concepts through the use of relevant software
  • Evaluate aesthetic and technical decisions relating to a post-production workflow
  • Apply advanced colour correction and colour grading techniques using industry software
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 5-10 minute demonstration video (100% of final mark).

Your demonstration video will show the progression from camera master files to high-quality colour-graded final deliverables using DaVinci Resolve or Filmlight Baselight.

What you’ll do

You'll develop advanced editing techniques, post-production workflows and essential knowledge of compression, encoding and manipulation of digital video to enhance employability.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a conceptual and practical understanding of offline and online workflow
  • Understand the fundamental concepts behind human vision and colour
  • Evaluate aesthetic and technical decisions relating to post-production workflow
  • Understand the process of compression and manipulation of video and digital images
  • Implement a comprehensive approach to the storage of file formats
  • Apply key theoretical and technical concepts through the use of relevant software
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour written exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour practical skills assessment (60% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

This final project is designed to bring together what you've learned in about script, documentary practice or narrative fiction storytelling, cinematographic craft, sound design and post-production practices.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage the demands and requirements of independent short film production and distribution
  • Create and produce a professional/industry standard short film, within a small production team
  • Present ideas in a professional pitch environment for a short film production
  • Implement the ethical responsibilities of the producer related to short film production
  • Appraise research sources and critically engage with major debates within non-fiction/fiction media to evaluate your work and that of your peers with reference to these issues
  • Synthesise ideas and organise material, and present it in a professional manner, using appropriate technologies to communicate the ideas clearly
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 2-hour lectures
  • 3 x 4-hours of project supervision
  • 10 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 358 hours studying independently (on your own or in your group). This is around 21 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • project output (70% of final mark) – a short film and production file
  • an oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark) – a reflective, analytical account of your project

What you'll do

These materials will then be used as a press pack or electronic press kit (EPK), similar to those used in the industry to target film festivals.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate professional practice and show the development of your group film
  • Develop, produce and promote a short film
  • Assess ethical debates and best practice within the film and TV industries
  • Produce promotional material for your own work
  • Summarise and apply self-directed learning and project/time management skills
Teaching activities
  • 6 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 182 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through project output (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage self-led learning and formulate a coherent argument about a chosen research topic
  • Demonstrate critical understanding of film texts and their interconnection with wider cultural, social and political contexts
  • Demonstrate critical understanding of economy of production, exhibition and distribution and how it affects film texts and audience reception
  • Employ research and textual analysis skills appropriate to the current stage of your degree programme
  • Communicate ideas and arguments effectively in writing or audio-visual format
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and project supervision.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 182 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through project output (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Competently understand and reflect on key skills required by industry for a specific career pathway or specialism
  • Analyse and critique specific discipline practices and procedures
  • Compare, contrast and discuss global differences and similarities relating to graduate roles film production
  • Identify and address your personal development needs
  • Deploy and integrate understanding of working with new emerging technologies and practices
Teaching activities
  • 20 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 8 hours of lectures
  • 4 hours of seminars
  • 2 hours of tutorial
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll oversee and/or design and publish, a personal professional website, which features an industry-level CV, show reel and other examples of work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate project management skills in the context of the work you do in the module
  • Demonstrate how to manage your workload and organise material effectively
  • Create an online platform showcasing your skills and examples of your work
  • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of your work, with reflective reviews and evaluation
  • Document your processes for each assignment in a professional and cohesive way
  • Gather and deploy the skills necessary for continuing personal development in different media contexts and effectively communicate this via a package for self promotion
  • Apply and critically reflect on your graduate and employability skills in a professional work environment
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend seminars and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 134 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (70% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (30% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

A man in a padded hooded jacket, smiling and waving, with a camera in hand against a waterfall in the background

I think the Film Production course was the perfect place to find out not only what I’m most passionate about, but also what I would enjoy making a living from.

Caleb Johnston, BA (Hons) Film Production 2020 graduate

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Workshops

You'll also learn by studying independently. You can borrow film production gear and use computer work stations in your own time to enhance your learning.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

How you're assessed

You'll be assessed through:

  • essay and report writing
  • video essays
  • film production artefacts
  • group projects and presentations
  • pitching
  • production files
  • practical assessments
  • workshops and supervised work sessions
  • masterclasses
  • tutorials
  • production meetings

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed will depend on the modules you select throughout your course. Here's an example from a previous year of how students on this course were typically assessed:

  • Year 1 students: 8% by written exams, 40% by practical exams and 52% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 8% by written exams, 28% by practical exams and 64% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 28% by practical exams and 72% by coursework

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, tutorials, seminars, practical classes, workshops, fieldwork and project supervision for about 12 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting your learning

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

You'll have regular contact with your personal tutor in learning activities or scheduled meetings. You can also make an appointment with them if you need extra support.

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have access to a Faculty student support advisor. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing and refer you to specialist support services.

You'll have help from a team of faculty academic skills tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

If you need support with software and equipment or you want to learn additional skills (including skills not covered on your course), our creative skills tutors provide free workshops, activities and one-on-one tutorials. Skills you can learn include life drawing, film camera operation and video production.

Computing support staff are always available to give technical support in the Faculty's computer suites during normal working hours. There's also some support available from 5pm to midnight at busy times of the year.

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to:

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2022 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £16,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Costs breakdown

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You may need to spend £50 to £100 each year on a variety of materials, such as DVDs or camera cards, and a small hard drive to back up media.

We recommended you get the most recent version of Avid accreditation text, which costs around £50–£80.

If you take the Student Enterprise Module, you’ll need to pay an additional cost of approximately £20.

The Underwater Filming and Media module is available if you haven’t dived before. It includes a PADI Open Water course combined with the Underwater Filming and Media course. It costs around £850.

The Underwater Filming and Media B module is available if you already hold a PADI Open Water certificate (or equivalent). It includes a further diving course (e.g. PADI Advanced Open Water), combined with the Underwater Filming and Media Course, and costs around £700 to cover tuition, transport and diving costs.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – PP31
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

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