Engineering and Technology with Foundation Year BEng (Hons)

female engineering and technology student in an engineering lab
UCAS Code
H108
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
4 years full-time, 5 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2022

Overview

This foundation year course sets you up for success if you don’t yet meet the entry requirements for one of our Bachelor's degrees in computing, engineering, surveying, maths or physics.

There’s more than one route to a degree, and missing out on the right grades first time round or beginning your studies as a mature student shouldn’t stop you realising your potential. On this BEng (Hons) Engineering and Technology degree with foundation year, you’ll develop the maths, science and technology skills vital for studying at degree level.

You’ll then move onto the first year of one of our Bachelor’s degrees.

Course highlights

  • Develop the knowledge to go onto your Bachelor's degree course with confidence
  • Study alongside other students working towards achieving a full degree, just like you
  • Experience hands-on practical work in our technology laboratories such as the Microcontroller and Digital lab, Energy Lab and the Future Technology Centre Computing Lab
  • Benefit from remote access to our simulation software, including Google App Scripting and LTSpice – supporting your studies even when you're off campus
  • Discover how to learn engineering concepts using everyday materials at home
  • Get student membership of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), paid for by the University

After your foundation year

Once you’ve successfully completed your foundation year, the topics and modules you go on to study will depend on the degree course you choose to take.

Quick guide to foundation year courses

A foundation year course allows you to:

  • Explore your options before choosing your Bachelor's degree course
  • Experience university life and get a taste for the way you'll be taught
  • Develop the study skills and knowledge you'll need to succeed in your chosen Bachelor's degree

Find out more about how this course works in our foundation year guide.

Entry requirements​

BEng (Hons) Engineering and Technology degree entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – EED–EEE
  • UCAS points – 48–56 points to include 1 A level, or equivalent Other qualifications such as Vocational A levels (AVCE), BTECs and Access courses will also be considered (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – MPP–PPP

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 5.5 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

A foundation year course opened doors for Holly

When she didn't get the A Level results she'd hoped for, a foundation year helped Holly to get on to the degree course she really wanted.

Read Holly's story

Facilities and specialist software

Female students using an oscilloscopes

Microcontroller and Digital Laboratory

Access to equipment including oscilloscopes, network analysers and other electronic equipment for measurement purposes, as well as hardware and software development tools for design, development and implementation of microcontroller systems.

A female member of staff adjusting imaging equipment for project

Future Technology Centre

Learn and interact with other students in our Technology Enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) environment. Create dynamic team-based learning environments with the use of presentation software to share your simulation software or code, while working alongside others.

Learn more

Student getting IT Support

Specialist engineering software

Get experience in essential engineering software such as Google App Scripting, within the context of solving engineering problems, and LTSpice, a SPICE-based analog electronic circuit simulator computer software. Use the software on campus, or connect to our lab computers remotely from home.

Careers and opportunities

Studying engineering, technology, maths or physics gives you in-depth knowledge of the parts that make the modern world work.

This foundation year, and the Bachelor's degree you move onto, will give you the skills employers need to implement innovative technologies and designs that could influence our healthcare system, aviation, transport, communication and so much more.

Depending on the degree you move onto after your foundation year, it's likely there will be a high demand for your profession in the industry sector you graduate into. And you'll get ongoing careers support from our Careers and Employability Service for up to 5 years after you graduate from your full Bachelor's degree.

Placement year opportunities

Between your third and fourth year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry. Taking an optional placement year will give you the experience you need to increase your chances of landing your perfect role after graduation.

We'll give you all the support you need to find a placement that prepares you for your career, and we'll continue to mentor you throughout your placement.

I enjoyed my course, particularly the project based learning, which allowed practical work to be carried out alongside the theory.

Sophie Washington, Engineering and Technology Student

What you'll study

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Foundation year

  • Computing for Engineers – 20 credits
  • Electrical Engineering – 20 credits
  • Engineering Materials and Design – 20 credits
  • Engineering Mathematics – 20 credits
  • Engineering Principles – 20 credits
  • Sustainability and Energy Studies – 20 credits

Years 2, 3 and 4

The modules you study in years 2, 3 and 4 will depend on which degree you move onto at the end of year 1.

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Teaching​

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • laboratory work
  • project work
  • Computed aided design and simulation activity
  • open access study

There's an emphasis on building practical skills, working with the latest technology and learning practices.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

How you're assessed​

You’ll be assessed through:

  • written examinations
  • coursework
  • practical tests
  • project work
  • presentations

The way you’re assessed will depend on the modules you select throughout your course. Here's an example from a previous year of how students on this course were typically assessed:

  • Year 1 students: 60% by written exams, 23% by practical exams and 17% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 54% by written exams, 6% by practical exams and 40% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 42% by written exams, 2% by practical exams and 56% by coursework
  • Year 4 students: 45% by written exams, 5% by practical exams and 50% by coursework

Supporting your learning

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your mathematics skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2022 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £18,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying and memory sticks.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll need to pay additional costs of £50–£1000 to cover travel, accommodation or subsistence if you take a placement abroad. The amount you’ll pay will vary, depending on the location and length of your stay.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – H108
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

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