Aerial view of Fedaia lake. BEng (Hons) Civil Engineering.
UCAS Code
H200 (BEng), H202 (MEng)
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years Full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement; 4 years full-time, 5 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2022
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Look up at skyscrapers you’ve designed, drive on roads you’ve engineered and lead on global infrastructure projects.

Learn to design, construct, operate and maintain infrastructure that supports everything from buildings, transportation, and flood defences to providing safe drinking water and sanitation. 

Study this accredited Civil Engineering degree in the city that gave the world Isambard Kingdom Brunel and step into a career that could shape the world.

BEng or MEng?

The 3-year Bachelor's degree (BEng) and 4-year integrated Master's degree (MEng) share many of the same modules in years 1–3.

When you finish the BEng course successfully, you'll meet the educational requirements for Incorporated Engineer (IEng) status. The MEng allows you to achieve a Master’s level degree with just one extra year of undergraduate study and when you finish the MEng course successfully, you'll meet the educational requirements for Chartered Engineer status (CEng).

Course highlights

  • Study practical diving and underwater engineering and infrastructure, due to our coastal location, and get a recognised PADI diving qualification
  • Visit constructions sites across the city, such as the new Ravelin Sports Centre or the upcoming Southsea Coastal Scheme
  • Explore soil types and rock formations on visits to the Isle of Wight and take a field trip to the National Construction College
  • Enter a global design competition, run by Engineers Without Borders
  • Learn from industry specialists – recent guest speakers have come from the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), Atkins, Portsmouth Water, Mott MacDonald, Portsmouth City Council, Colas and WSP
Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT)
Institute of Highway Engineers
Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE)
The Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

95% of BEng (Hons) Civil Engineering graduates in work or further study 15 months after this course (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey 2018/19)

90% of MEng (Hons) Civil Engineering graduates in work or further study 15 months after this course (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey 2018/19)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Institution of Structural Engineers, the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation, and the Institute of Highway Engineers. The BEng meets in full the academic requirement for Incorporated Engineer (IEng) and in part the academic requirement for Chartered Engineer (CEng). The MEng meets in full the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).

Entry requirements​

BEng (Hons) Civil Engineering degree entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–128 points, to include an A level in a numerical subject, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

MEng Civil Engineering Master's degree entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – AAB–BBB
  • UCAS points – 120–136 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 40 points from Mathematics (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDD–DDM
  • International Baccalaureate – 27

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

My favourite part of the course was acquiring knowledge from the module 'Behaviour of Structures' and applying it to the 'ENISE bridge challenge' that took place in France, where I designed a model bridge that would not fail in torsion when an external load is applied.

Eman El Briri, MEng Civil Engineering student

Your facilities

The Hydraulics Laboratory

This lab has a 7-metre long tilting channel for investigating open channel flow, a wave generator and mobile hydraulics benches – all the equipment you need to research and test your understanding of infrastructure.

Find out more

Welcome to the hydraulics lab.

This is a powerful piece of apparatus that can show you what happens really when flow, like in a river, passes over a weir. You can get the sense of typical flow patterns.

If we've got a given flow rate, what happens when an obstacle is placed in the flow and also what happens downstream of it. So we get a different sort of flow regime on one side compared to the other and you'll see this as it fills up, that we get a flow rate of something like 20,

The flow builds up on one side, passes over the weir and then reaches the other side like this. So it's the same flow rate, but you can see it's kind of smooth, and then it degenerates into a much rougher profile on the other side.

We call this subcritical and supercritical flow. Subcritical flow is just typically what we might find in a water treatment works during distribution of water around different parts of the works. The other side, this supercritical flow, we have to be quite careful because it can cause damage to the environment. It can cause what we call scour or erosion.

Weirs are really very important in civil engineering because what we're trying to do is to obtain a relationship between flow rate and water level. Pretty obviously really, the higher the water level is, the faster the flow rate.

There are some very precise mathematical equations that can relate that flow rate to the water level here.

Soil and ground facilities

The Geotechnics lab hosts fully automated testing equipment and kit for characterising fine and coarse grained soils.

Find out more

 

If you are thinking about the soil and the soil mechanic, the load of the house needs to transfer into the ground. So the structural element, which helps you to transfer the load of the structure into the ground, is a foundation.

We are going to teach you how you should design the foundation and everything, so you should know about the soil parameters.

In the first year of your study, I'm going to talk about the different types of soil, the soil classification, and also how we are going to take a sample from the site and doing some seive analysis, classify the soil as a coarse material and defined soil. So this is the basic stuff that you need to know about the soil mechanics.

So when you are starting your second year of your study, you have a chance to do more experimental tests, doing some probability tests. You are going to do some odometer tests or the direct share to figure out what is the soil behaviour when you are checking the bearing capacity of the foundation, or what is this soil behaviour when you are loading or unloading.

When you are starting your third year of your study, you have a better idea about the soil mechanic, so you are going to do more traxial tests using the GDS test. And also we are going to teach you some numerical modelling because when you are graduating, you should have a nice CV.

As part of your final year you have a chanceto do some research work which will help you to become independent in the research. If you're thinking about the great material that we have, which is improving the tension of the soil, we can see that the soil particle is moving between the descript and this information is very important for the manufacture to find out what is the best shape of the descript or what is the best shape of this apparatus.

So this is a type of research that you are able and you have a chance to do, as a final project.

I hope I see all of you here in the future.

Close up of gloved hand picking up a test tube with purple liquid from a line of test tubes

Environmental Technology Laboratory

This lab hosts all the facilities you need to conduct simple water tests for biochemical oxygen demand to suspended solids, nutrient analysis, pH and conductivity.

Learn more

Aerial shot of environmental tech field station

Environmental Technology Field Station

Developed in partnership with Southern Water, you can use this facility to familiarise yourself with running a treatment plant, conduct tests using professional standard equipment and measure your hypotheses and results using samples currently in the ecosystem.

Learn more

Woman looking into yellow concrete mixer

Concrete laboratory

Design, mix and test different concrete mixes, and observe and record all stages of the concrete production process via a built in camera system and live stream in this lab.

Explore the lab

Careers and opportunities

All civil engineering roles are listed in the UK Government’s 'skills shortage list' and you can expect an average salary from £30,000 up to £70,000.

In fact, 95% of our BEng graduates and 90% of our MEng course graduates are in work or further study 15 months after they graduate and 100% of those MEng graduates are in highly skilled work – which means the skills you’ll learn on our course are in high demand. 80% of those graduates work as engineering professionals.

What’s more, 100% of our graduates find their work meaningful. So start making a difference, and be rewarded well for it.

Graduate destinations

Our graduates have worked for companies such as:

  • Sir Robert McAlpine – a civil engineering company that’s contributed to the construction of the NHS Nightingale Hospitals and the expansion of the Royal Albert Hall
  • Skanska – a recent project, Haymarket Edinburgh, provides more than 380,000 sq. ft designed to benefit the local residential and business community
  • Multiplex Construction Europe – with offices in Australia, the Middle East, United Kingdom and Canada, this company has completed more than 1,000 projects globally
  • Balfour Beatty – a leading international infrastructure group developing projects from the UK to the United States and Hong Kong
  • Gallagher Group – a UK company delivering civil engineering contracts ranging in value from £100,000 to £15 million

What jobs can you do with a civil engineering degree?

Roles you could go into include:

  • materials engineer
  • geotechnical engineer
  • civil engineer
  • construction manager
  • transport planner
  • structural engineer

Meet our award-winning civil engineering graduate: Mimi Nwosu

"When I spoke to my [company] director, he was shocked at how much I already knew. I explained that this was because of my course and my placement. The University equipped me well for life outside university. I was actually offered five jobs before I left."

Mimi won the Rising Star Award at the Institute of Civil Engineers London Civil Engineering Awards 2020.

See how Mimi became an award-winning graduate

Placement year (optional)

Taking an optional placement year will give you the experience you need to increase your chances of landing your perfect role after graduation. Our students earn an average salary of £19,000 during their placements.

We'll give you all the support you need to find a placement that prepares you for your career, and we'll continue to mentor you throughout your placement.

Potential roles

Previous students have taken placement roles such as:

  • service auditor
  • trainee civil engineer
  • student site engineer

Potential destinations

They've completed placements at organisations including:

  • Osborne
  • Network Rail
  • Francis Jackson Homes
  • Wentworth House Partnership (Keltbray)
  • Cappagh
  • Dyer and Butler
Joshua's story
"I would definitely recommend Portsmouth..."

Joshua is going into his third year of study on our BEng (Hons) Civil Engineering degree, having just finished a placement year at Geoffrey Osborne, a UK contractor. Find out why he chose to study with us, and what's next for him after graduation.

What you'll study on this Civil Engineering degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Year 1

Core modules

What you’ll do

You'll examine the risks and mitigation methods in cost and quality management, health and safety, and environmental management.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise basic techniques used in common construction activities
  • Identify health, safety, environmental and quality considerations relevant to the construction site
  • Outline materials for permanent and temporary construction structures
  • State appropriate construction methods and quantify resources
  • Identify common risks and mitigation measures appropriate for the construction process
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through 2 x 1-hour written exams (50% of final mark, each).

What you’ll do

You'll begin with algebraic manipulation and equation solving, then work with vectors and matrices before moving on to differentiation and integration.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Solve linear and polynomial equations
  • Manipulate vectors and matrices, and solve systems of linear equations using matrix methods
  • Apply differentiation and integration techniques to functions of one variable
  • Apply differentiation techniques to functions of two or more variables
  • Solve first-order and linear second-order differential equations
  • Select and apply appropriate mathematical methods to the solution of civil engineering problems
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 3 x 500-word coursework exercises (10% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn skills that underpin consultancy and contracting, identify skills required for roles that interest you, and understand the roles of professional bodies in the industry.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Create intelligible scaled drawing using computer-aided design (CAD) software
  • Complete hand drawings in isometric projection, orthographic projection and eye height perspective
  • Recognise and apply the creative design process
  • Measure angles and heights with appropriate instruments and recognise sources of error
  • Distinguish the career paths and development needs in civil engineering and construction
Teaching activities
  • 36 hours of lectures
  • 36 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 144 hours studying independently. This is around 6 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework assignment (40% of the final mark)
  • a coursework assignment including manual and CAD drawings (30% of the final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral presentation (30% of the final mark)

What you'll do

In this module, you'll test steel, concrete and other materials in the lab to understand and describe their behaviour. You'll also learn to classify soil types and test their permeability and shear strength.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the constituents and properties of different types of materials and soils
  • Recognise concepts relevant to the behaviour and selection of materials and soils
  • Explain how changing the proportions when mixing concrete affects its manufacture and performance
  • Outline soil testing procedure
Teaching activities
  • 42 hours of lectures
  • 22 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 8 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word report (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,200-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

To choose this module, you'll need an A-level in mathematics or engineering analysis, or similar.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Derive loads, resolve forces and carry out simple equilibrium checks
  • Analyse the forces in pin jointed frames
  • Calculate and draw shear force and bending moment diagrams
  • Calculate the required properties of non-standard beams
  • Evaluate the stresses in members that are subject to multiple actions
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 90-minute lectures
  • 24 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 4 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll study the behaviour of fluids, and how they operate in conduits and channels. You'll also explore environmental science in its relation to civil and water engineering.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and apply key analytical principles of fluid mechanics
  • Apply the principles of fluid mechanics to a range of common engineering problems
  • Identify and propose solutions for closed conduit flow problems
  • Analyse the hydraulics of rotodynamic machines in association with their pipe systems
  • Perform flow analysis calculations relating to through open channels, control and gauging structures
  • Assess the impact of water engineering on the natural environment
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 23 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 1 x 2-hour lab class
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 129 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you’ll do

To take this option, you'll need to take Understanding Structures - Analysis and Design in year 1.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the virtual work method to determine displacements in structures
  • Examine and evaluate buckling behaviour of structures
  • Investigate and evaluate the degree of static indeterminacy of structures
  • Analyse statically indeterminate structures using both flexibility and stiffness methods
  • Evaluate the collapse load for steel structures, and predict their collapse mechanisms
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply basic philosophies of structural engineering design
  • Employ appropriate Eurocodes for a range of common structural elements in steel and reinforced concrete
  • Design simple structural elements in steel and reinforced concrete and present calculations in an appropriate format
  • Analyse loading paths in buildings and formulate calculations of basic structural elements
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 22 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 3-hour exam (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse data using statistical software
  • Present your findings with appropriate graphical and statistical techniques
  • Perform risk calculations based on probability models of engineering and business scenarios
  • Explain basic economic principles and use common economic appraisal methods for construction projects
  • Develop cash flow streams for business within the construction industry
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll work on a design project that considers social, economic and environmental issues and follow our Department of Employability's Graduate Employment Unit. To choose this option you need to have taken Professional Development 1 in your first year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the creative design process to a brief
  • Assess data required to undertake a design project
  • Reflect on the social, economic and environmental outcomes of your project
  • Articulate your design appropriately, using graphics, report writing and model making
  • Recognise what you want from a career, and the skills and knowledge you have to offer
  • Evaluate options and make an action plan to achieve your career goals in changing circumstances
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 168 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 500-word report (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll focus on structure-soil interaction, linking a fundamental understanding of geotechnical issues with its practical application.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand factors affecting the performance of construction materials
  • Recommend construction materials that are fit for purpose
  • Analyse and calculate the bearing capacity and settlement of shallow foundations
  • Measure the mechanical strength of natural ground, the undrained shear strength, stiffness and consolidation coefficients of soils in the lab
  • Describe the process of site investigation and compare different methods of sampling
  • Design a retaining wall and check its geotechnical stability
Teaching activities
  • 25 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 13 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (40% of final mark)
  • a 1.5-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll examine the use of BIM for existing conditions, animations and renderings, scheduling, sequencing and simulation of construction processes, measurement, estimating and costing, conceptual and detailed energy analysis, and facility management.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the extent of fragmentation in the architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) industry and its impact on the successful outcome of a project
  • Critically evaluate when and what information is required and what tools will facilitate this data exchange
  • Appraise the different dimensions of BIM, what information is required, by whom and for what
  • Collaboratively work in multi-disciplinary teams to complete a construction project
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

To choose this option, you will have to make a medical declaration, pass a swimming test, and have a medical examination if necessary.

There is a fee for this unit.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the operation and use of SCUBA diving equipment
  • Display proficiency in basic diving procedures
  • Plan, organise and conduct safe diving activities appropriate to the circumstances
  • Describe and explain the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) legislation, risk assessment and project reporting needed for a diving project
  • Plan a scientific dive and produce a written project plan
  • Use and explain a range of scientific and technical diving techniques
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 32 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • an external PADI Open Water Course (0% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word coursework exercise (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll then learn how to apply your diving skills to the theory and practice of underwater engineering operations. To choose this option, you must have a basic diving qualification (e.g. PADI Open Water diving certificate or equivalent). You will also have to make a medical declaration, pass a swimming test, and have a medical examination if necessary. There is a fee for this unit.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Plan and execute a dive to 30m depth
  • Navigate underwater using natural features and a magnetic compass
  • Plan, organise and conduct safe diving activities appropriate to the circumstances
  • Describe and explain the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) legislation, risk assessment and project reporting required to conduct a diving project
  • Plan a scientific dive and produce a written project plan
  • Use and explain a range of scientific and technical diving techniques
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 32 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical assessment (0% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word coursework exercise (100% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll examine construction requirements and potential in this growing area.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Illustrate the mechanisms of climate change and their relationship with energy use and policy
  • Analyse the thermodynamic cycles of energy generating technologies
  • Summarise the main features of conventional, emerging and renewable energy and energy recovery technologies
  • Appraise the construction issues associated with extraction, transportation and storage of energy resources and fuels and design appropriate features for such an installation
  • Calculate the energy use of buildings and assess the contribution of energy conservation technologies
  • Assess the influence of geological and geotechnical factors on the location of energy generation plants
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 16 x 1-hour seminars
  • 8 hours of external visits
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll attend a one-week residential field course, working in groups, and will reflect on your activity on your return. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply practical engineering surveying techniques to collect field survey data
  • Assess the usability of engineering surveying equipment
  • Use independent methods to assess field survey data for integrity and consistency
  • Calculate the data for positioning engineering works, and construct physical controls in the field
  • Reflect on your performance as part of a team
  • Create computer-aided design (CAD) drawings to present your survey results appropriately 
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 56 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 60 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word portfolio (80% of final mark)
  • a technical drawing (20% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll experience work-related learning in Portsmouth Dockyard and Portsea to enhance your communication and partnership skills. You'll also evaluate best practice by comparing historic industrial structures and residential buildings with examples of refurbishment and re-use.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast cultural and environmental factors that enhance the value and influence the retention of heritage property by individuals and society
  • Evaluate the complex relationship between residential, commercial and museum needs when developing strategies and policies for heritage property management and development
  • Distinguish between various heritage conservation and planning strategies, such as World Heritage sites, listings and conservation areas, used by national and local governments
  • Analyse the key factors and evaluation techniques that must be included in a development plan for a heritage site, assessing their relevance and significance
  • Critically discuss literature on the cultural and environmental development of heritage interpretation and property management
  • Work as a member of a group to enable the researching, preparation and delivery of an oral presentation on the Portsea Heritage Project
Teaching activities
  • 16 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 hours of external visits
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 148 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word group oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark) – prepared through workshops and group work
  • a 750-word written assignment (20% of final mark) – gives you experience critiquing a book relevant to Heritage Property
  • a 2,250-word report (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

As part of the assessment for this module, you'll evaluate your experience against the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) Initial Professional Development framework.

You'll get the opportunity to put into practice your learning from the first two years of the degree and improve your chances of securing a professional level role upon graduation.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate your learning, personal development and future career opportunities
  • Describe tasks undertaken and responsibilities held in the course of (self) employment
  • Differentiate your employability as graduates, as a result of the placement experience
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour seminars
  • 195 hours of placement
Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 4,000-word portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll develop a fundamental understanding of project management processes. You'll also learn to apply basic principles and processes of project management.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the principles of project management
  • Apply project management principles, including programming
  • Prepare a clear and well-presented project management report
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

The focus will enable you to make comparisons with markets in the UK. You'll also look at alternative models of construction and delivery, including the role that new funding and phasing methods may play.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Combine and apply international knowledge on property development
  • Analyse construction, property market behaviour and/or the built environment in the subject country
  • Compare, contrast and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of different international perspectives
  • Engage actively and effectively in teamwork activities
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 1-hour lectures
  • 40 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework report (75% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

Year 3

Core modules – BEng (Hons) only

What you'll do

Your project will normally involve the identification and analysis of a problem, and will involve investigations into:

  • design
  • analytical parametric study
  • laboratory experiments
  • field-based activities
  • case studies
  • surveys
  • documentary or database research
  • critical analysis

You'll be expected to comply with health and safety requirements and ethics procedures while completing your project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Solve significant engineering or surveying problems, critically assessing the validity and limitations of your solution
  • Critically analyse and compare relevant literature, data and experience
  • Develop and plan a programme of work for an in-depth investigation
  • Design appropriate data collection strategies
  • Apply sound engineering or surveying principles to solve technical problems
Teaching activities
  • 16 hours of supervised time in the studio/workshop
  • 12 hours of tutor support and/or guidance
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (10% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 7,000-word dissertation (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll progress from conceptual design to a detailed design phase incorporating sustainability, health and safety, cost considerations and appraisals of your design choices.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess problems of civil engineering design and evaluate options
  • Make decisions in open-ended situations, and develop and design schemes to meet a design brief
  • Present and articulate design solutions in written, drawn and oral forms
  • Resolve issues related to working in small teams of your peers
  • Assess and incorporate constructability, health & safety, sustainability and environmental processes relevant to your design project
  • Carry out a costing and economic assessment of your design
Teaching activities
  • 32 hours of seminars
  • 12 hours of project supervision
  • 3 hours of external visits
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 153 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll study AUTOCAD software and career skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify your employability strengths and weaknesses, and take steps to remedy areas of weakness
  • Deliver strong presentations in a work-based interview
  • Assess your learning against engineering council attributes
  • Evaluate your opportunities for graduate level work in civil engineering
  • Produce AUTOCAD drawings with appropriate layout and detailing
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 2-hour seminars
  • 10 x 1-hour interactive case study presentations
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral presentation (15% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (55% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn to validate your geotechnical hand calculations with industry-standard software, and develop creative and economical solutions to live problems.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate failure mechanisms of soil slopes and compute slope stability analysis
  • Evaluate the problems related to geotechnical design and construction of piled foundations and retaining walls
  • Identify and propose remedial measures to slope and flexible retaining wall failure
  • Perform geotechnical design using established formulas and approaches to risk
  • Appraise the likely long term performance of a range of construction materials.
  • Design and specify construction materials to meet stated service conditions
Teaching activities
  • 1 x 1-hour practical class and/or workshop
  • 41 hours of lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 5 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at technology and policy, managing demand for transport, improving usage of current transport infrastructure and methods of influencing transport trends.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the processes affecting the demand for transport
  • Predict traffic flows at junctions and on small networks
  • Design and model simple road traffic networks
  • Evaluate the social, economic and environmental impacts of new highway infrastructure
  • Assess and evaluate traffic management techniques
Teaching activities
  • 20 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 hours of external visits
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (40% of final mark) – a 4-person group assignment of 2,000-words total, 500 words per individual
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll study rainfall and its effect on available water, its collection and distribution, waste water and water conservation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Predict river flow and water resource availability by applying standard models
  • Examine non-uniform flow in open channels
  • Apply standard lab tests to examine flow behaviour, analyse water quality, and appraise compliance of results with appropriate standards
  • Assess the treatment processes, technologies and strategies for drinking water
  • Examine major waste water treatment technologies, their application and design criteria
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 120-minute lectures
  • 6 hours of external visits
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 119 hours studying independently. This is around 7 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

Core modules – MEng only

What you'll do

You'll study AUTOCAD software and career skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify your employability strengths and weaknesses, and take steps to remedy areas of weakness
  • Deliver strong presentations in a work-based interview
  • Assess your learning against engineering council attributes
  • Evaluate your opportunities for graduate level work in civil engineering
  • Produce AUTOCAD drawings with appropriate layout and detailing
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 2-hour seminars
  • 10 x 1-hour interactive case study presentations
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral presentation (15% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (55% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll study rainfall and its effect on available water, its collection and distribution, waste water and water conservation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Predict river flow and water resource availability by applying standard models
  • Examine non-uniform flow in open channels
  • Apply standard lab tests to examine flow behaviour, analyse water quality, and appraise compliance of results with appropriate standards
  • Assess the treatment processes, technologies and strategies for drinking water
  • Examine major waste water treatment technologies, their application and design criteria
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 120-minute lectures
  • 6 hours of external visits
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 119 hours studying independently. This is around 7 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at technology and policy, managing demand for transport, improving usage of current transport infrastructure and methods of influencing transport trends.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the processes affecting the demand for transport
  • Predict traffic flows at junctions and on small networks
  • Design and model simple road traffic networks
  • Evaluate the social, economic and environmental impacts of new highway infrastructure
  • Assess and evaluate traffic management techniques
Teaching activities
  • 20 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 hours of external visits
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (40% of final mark) – a 4-person group assignment of 2,000-words total, 500 words per individual
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn to validate your geotechnical hand calculations with industry-standard software, and develop creative and economical solutions to live problems.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate failure mechanisms of soil slopes and compute slope stability analysis
  • Evaluate the problems related to geotechnical design and construction of piled foundations and retaining walls
  • Identify and propose remedial measures to slope and flexible retaining wall failure
  • Perform geotechnical design using established formulas and approaches to risk
  • Appraise the likely long term performance of a range of construction materials.
  • Design and specify construction materials to meet stated service conditions
Teaching activities
  • 1 x 1-hour practical class and/or workshop
  • 41 hours of lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 5 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

Year 4

Core modules – MEng only

What you'll do

You'll learn how to use FEM software packages to solve engineering problems related to the design of real structures. You'll also learn about structural analysis, numerical analysis and engineering problem solving.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise and solve engineering problems
  • Formulate, analyse and test the behaviour of structures using a commercial FEM package
  • Assess and evaluate the results from the computer analysis
  • Evaluate proposed solutions to engineering problems by using constitutive relationships and material failure theorems
Teaching activities
  • 48 hours of lectures
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.Assessment

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

In this module, you'll get a grounding in environmental engineering and learn about the environmental impacts of civil engineering projects. You'll also get an advanced level of understanding of a variety of environmental issues. 

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Apply life cycle analysis and environmental impact assessments to Civil Engineering projects
  • Assess whether pollutants or processes are causing contamination
  • Propose remedial measures to mitigate environmental degradation
  • Critically evaluate the assessment of sustainable urban drainage schemes
  • Design and model basic water supply pipe networks using water distribution system modelling software packages
  • Prepare technical reports on laboratory findings
Teaching activities
  • 10 hours of fieldwork
  • 22 hours of lectures
  • 12 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework report (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

The design projects are created with input from professional contacts in the civil engineering industry, so you'll experience what it's like to work in a civil engineering consultancy business. You'll make professional contacts, get advice and guidance from experts, carry out research and conduct off-campus site visits.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Assess complex matters of civil engineering design and make a critically informed and balanced selection, considering the economic, social and technical aspects of the problem
  • Work independently and as part of small groups to develop and design appropriate civil/structural schemes to a project brief, using appropriate engineering analysis and tools
  • Research, assess and use appropriate construction methods in a project, taking into account relevant constructability, health and safety, environmental and qualitative processes
  • Develop a project cost plan and construction programme
  • Present and explain design proposals and solutions orally and in written technical reports, supplemented by drawings
Teaching activities
  • 12 x hours of supervised time in studio/workshop
  • 26 x hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 10 x hours of seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 552 hours studying independently. This is around 17 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 9,500-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

As well as studying project management tools and techniques, you'll also look in-depth at the project management processes within the project life-cycle, and study relationships between the participants at different project phases in real-life case studies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Critically assess and use a wide range of project management tools, techniques and processes
  • Justify appropriate project management tools, techniques and/or processes to suit different project scenarios, and evaluate their effectiveness
  • Discuss the influence of project management in providing effective health and safety management in construction
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

The placement furthered my skills in problem-solving, communication, time management, teamwork and individual initiatives.

Thomas Glenn, Civil Engineering student

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • workshops
  • seminars
  • group work

There's an emphasis on learning through field trips and lab work with many practical opportunities to put your knowledge into practice.

Interact with the 360 image below to see our civil engineering students using surveying equipment on a practical class in the centre of Northern Quarter campus.

How you're assessed

  • written exams
  • web assessments
  • essays and reports
  • project presentations
  • a dissertation

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you're assessed will depend on the modules you select throughout your course. Here's an example from a previous academic year of how students on this course were typically assessed:

BEng students only:

  • Year 1 students: 68% by written exams, 4% by practical exams and 28% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 63% by written exams, 4% by practical exams and 33% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 20% by written exams, 12% by practical exams and 68% by coursework 

MEng students only:

  • Year 1 students: 68% by written exams, 4% by practical exams and 28% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 63% by written exams, 4% by practical exams and 33% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 30% by written exams, 8% by practical exams and 62% by coursework
  • Year 4 students: 13% by written exams, 43% by practical exams and 44% by coursework

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Civil Engineering degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops for about 18 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2, 3 and 4, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting your learning

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your mathematics skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2022 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International (non-EU) students – £18,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying and memory sticks.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

We will provide you with hard hats and Hi-Vis vests. You will need to buy your own safety boots costing approximately £35.

If you go on the optional residential field trip in year 2, you’ll need to contribute around £230 to the cost.

If you do the optional Energy and Resources Infrastructure module, you'll need to contribute £100 to the cost of a field trip.

If you take either of the 2 optional Diving and Underwater Engineering modules in year 2, you’ll need to contribute to the cost.

This is approximately £858 for the Diving A module and approximately £768 for the Diving B module.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – H200 (BEng) or H202 (Meng)
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form:

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

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