Criminology and Criminal Justice BSc (Hons)

Student in wig practises in law court
UCAS Code
M930
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2021, September 2022

Applying for 2021/22 entry? See how you'll be taught in our Covid information for applicants.

Overview

Do you have an interest in why people commit crimes and how society should deal with crime? Do you want to kick-start an interesting career that allows you to contribute positively to people's lives?

Criminology is the study of crime and criminals, while criminal justice relates to the agencies involved in the justice and penal systems – such as police, prisons, probation – and their responses to crime. 

On this BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice degree, you'll learn about key issues in criminal justice, such as the sentencing of offenders and the reputation and responsibilities of police forces. You'll develop your knowledge of the bodies involved in law enforcement, government, the court system and international agencies and use scientific theories and principles to understand the causes of crime.

In years 2 and 3, you'll study topics that match your ambitions and interests, with a choice of more than 30 module options in areas such as hate crime, dangerous offenders and missing persons. You can also get credit towards the pre-entry qualifications for a career as a trainee probation officer and police officer.

Before your final year, you'll have the chance to apply your skills and knowledge in the field on an optional sandwich year. You can also enhance your CV and prepare yourself for your career on modules that allow you to convert work and volunteering experience into credit towards your degree. 

This course is ideal prep for a career working in police, probation, the prison service, community safety, and third sector roles such as victim support. You'll also set yourself up to do postgraduate study or research on crime prevention and criminology.

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

93% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2020)

No. 17 in the UK for Criminology courses (The Guardian University Guide, 2021)

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice degree entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–128 points from 3 A levels or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 29–30

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What you'll experience

On this Criminology and Criminal Justice degree course, you'll:

  • Examine the causes and consequences of crime from different perspectives
  • Learn from practitioners with criminal justice experience and academics whose research in areas such as missing persons and policing shapes the content of the course and Government policy
  • Join in lively debates in one of the country’s largest criminology departments and contribute ideas on how we should respond to crime as a society
  • Tailor your studies by choosing modules that match your interests and ambitions – topics you can choose include new approaches to policing,  terrorism, hate crime, victimology and wildlife crime
  • Interact with practitioners from criminal justice agencies, businesses and charitable organisations
  • Discuss your career options with a panel of graduates who are working in criminal justice

You can also:

  • Practise applying your skills and knowledge in facilities that replicate the environments you'll work in during your career, such as our Crime Scene Simulation Facility and Replica Court Room 
  • Study modules that provide credit towards the pre-entry qualifications for a career as a Trainee Probation Officer or Police Officer, reducing the amount of study you have to do after the course to join the police or probation service
  • Apply your knowledge in the field on an optional year-long work placement, boosting your professional network and employability prospects after the course
  • Spend a year abroad, studying with an international partner university
  • Learn a new language and get credits towards your degree on the University's language programme

It was amazing to be taught by the authors of the books I was referencing – it fills you with confidence knowing your lecturers are experts in their fields and so passionate about their work.

Hanna Taha, BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice

Careers and opportunities

A degree in criminology and criminal justice sets you up for a career in the criminal justice sector and allows you to gain transferable skills you can use in a variety of related sectors, such as counter fraud. It also gives you multiple opportunities for further study or research at postgraduate level.

When you complete the course successfully, you'll have the skills and knowledge you need to work in the police, probation and prison services in areas such as community safety, crime prevention, fraud investigation and youth offending teams. You can take career-specific optional modules, such as "Economic Crime and Fraud Examination", which covers the knowledge linked to the professional accreditation for a career as an economic crime examiner. Or you can cover the knowledge modules required to become a Probation Officer by studying the community justice modules on this course. 

You’ll also be equipped for roles in the commercial sector and other graduate sectors, such as counter fraud roles in banking, the NHS or the DWP.

Previous graduates have worked for organisations including:

  • Hampshire Constabulary, Avon and Somerset Constabulary, Metropolitan Police, Thames Valley Police, South Wales Police, Kent Police
  • National Probation Service
  • G4S and other community rehabilitation providers
  • Financial service companies
  • Greene King

Roles our previous graduates have gone onto include:

  • Investigative data analyst
  • Police officer
  • Probation service officer
  • Youth offending support officer
  • Emergency planning officer
  • Offender case administrator
  • Detective
  • Personnel security analyst
  • Business development facilitator
  • Finance account executive

New technologies, emerging research and increasing political and public interest means the way authorities, society, victims and offenders identify and respond to crime is always changing. Her Majesty's Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS)’ Probation Workforce Strategy (2020) aims to recruit skilled and talented people to probation officer roles. This results in good demand for jobs in the criminal justice and penal sector.

Work experience and career planning

You'll have an employability section, designed for criminology students, in your learning environment, where you'll see relevant volunteering, work experience and graduate opportunities, along with support and workshops. You'll be able to attend employability events with guest speakers from inside and outside the University, and your personal tutor will be there to help guide your option choices to serve your career goals. 

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course. You'll meet them in your first year, when you take part in a volunteering workshop as part of your studies, and throughout your time with us they'll help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

Students have already had volunteer placements with the Hampshire Police and Crime Commissioner, Portsmouth Abuse and Rape Counselling Service, and the British Red Cross. 

We'll also be available to help, advise and support you for up to 5 years as you advance in your career.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

Previous students have done placements at organisations such as:

  • Aurora New Dawn – a charity offering support to survivors of domestic abuse, sexual violence and stalking
  • Why Me? – a charity supporting victims of crime
  • Answers Investigation – a private detective agency
  • Hampshire Constabulary, HMRC and the Office of National Statistics
  • You can also spend this year studying overseas at one of our partner universities in Europe, south Asia, Australia or North America.

We'll help you secure a work or study placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Abigail's story
"There was no other university that made me feel the same..."

Discover what made Abigail choose Portsmouth to study a BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice degree, and what she loves about the uni, city and studying here.

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Criminology and Criminal Justice degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Year 1

Core Modules

What you'll do

In approaching the study of criminology from a sociological perspective, you’ll explore the way in which crime is connected to its social context.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and discuss the definition of crime within society
  • Identify and reflect on social justice issues in relation to inequality and crime
  • Examine the impact of crime on society
  • Review societal responses to crime
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 9 x 1-hour seminars
  • 3 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine the historical analysis of criminal justice systems and the core contemporary aspects of those systems.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise the historical development of criminal justice
  • Describe the key functions of current criminal justice agencies
  • Discuss philosophies and methods of punishment used in criminal justice
  • Recognise and reflect on examples of multi-agency working in criminal justice
  • Develop skills relating to independent working and effective teamwork
  • Obtain knowledge contributing to the ability to make informed career decisions within the sector
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1.5-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word portfolio project (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll focus on the skills required for success in your first year and that will build the foundations for success in your second and third years. You’ll develop an understanding of the core concepts in social sciences research, and become confident with your academic skills in relation to reading, writing, presenting, reflecting, and critical thinking.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise the fundamental aspects of academic scholarship
  • Differentiate between the quality of academic sources
  • Reflect on personal developmental needs and make informed career decisions
  • Understand fundamental elements of research in criminology
  • Understand basic principles of quantitative and qualitative research
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the subject area and interrelationships with other relevant subjects
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 342 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (30% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to the core theoretical approaches in psychology, with a focus on the practical application of theories within the criminal justice system. These theories cover criminal investigation, treatment of offenders, risk assessment, policing and researching crime.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Engage creatively across disciplines
  • Locate and access information relevant to the subject area
  • Consider applications of theories to solve problems in society
  • Develop appreciation of ethical practice
  • Communicate ideas effectively in written form
  • Develop a reflective understanding of the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

Starting from the seventeenth century, it charts the development of the social sciences through the Renaissance and Enlightenment period. You’ll examine the development of criminological analysis, considering the rise of the scientific study of crime and criminality, and review the multi-disciplinary nature of the subject area.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Outline the historical context and origins of the subject area
  • Describe the key ideas that drove the development of the social sciences
  • Think independently and creatively across discipline boundaries
  • Recognise and apply new and existing knowledge in relation to explaining criminal behavior
  • Outline and describe the social, cultural, political and economic contexts that influenced the development of criminology and criminological thinking
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1.5-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

Year 2

Core Modules

What you'll do

This module sets out a clear framework in which you’ll explore the complexities and challenges in criminal justice processes, and develop critical analysis in criminal justice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject area
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access, and engage with information pertinent to the subject area
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of criminal justice issues
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 7 x 2-hour seminars
  • 7 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a set exercise (coursework) (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,250-word written assignment including essay (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your understanding of the role criminology and the social sciences have had in engineering social order. You’ll explore accounts from critical social theory and sociological analysis of social control in relation to social and cultural resistance and dissent against the imposition of control and social engineering by the state.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject area
  • Appraise different critical standpoints of social control
  • Locate, access and critically engage with information pertinent to the subject matter
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of social justice
  • Develop a further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 7.5 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute coursework exercise (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll use practical research work as the basis for understanding research in criminology and use this to develop a viable research proposal for your third year dissertation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area and apply it to your own research projects
  • Analytically and critically think about research in criminology
  • Develop your skills in research for wider application
  • Identify the ethical issues inherent in criminology research and develop responses to these issues
  • Critically evaluate how research can generate creative solutions to societal issues
  • Work independently and in groups on research projects, delivering the results of these projects in a variety of forms
Teaching activities
  • 6 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 6 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 4 hours of fieldwork study
  • 6 hours of project supervision

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-page piece of coursework (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

Optional Modules

What you'll do

You’ll develop a critical appreciation of the origins, debates and future direction of the Probation Service in England and Wales. You'll study the management of offenders in the community, in light of key changes and challenges to the structure, organisation and values of the current penal, political and social landscape.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Question and reflect on your understanding of community justice
  • Locate, access and analyse new and existing information relevant to community justice
  • Demonstrate transferable knowledge based skills for working with offenders in the community
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 9 x 1-hour seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (60% of final mark)

 

What you'll do

The core themes are state crimes (of commission and omission) and the response of the international community, particularly the response of international judicial, state and inter-governmental, and global civil society actors. You’ll explore crimes against humanity (including genocide and war crimes) and against democracy, state-corporate crime, contemporary slavery and the trafficking of humans.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop critical, reflective knowledge and understanding of state crimes concepts (of commission and omission), examining and critiquing the boundaries of subject knowledge in a disciplinary context
  • Appraise the nature of state crimes of commission, including crimes against humanity and State Crimes Against Democracy
  • Appraise the nature of state crimes of omission, including state-corporate and environmental market-based crimes, contemporary slavery and trafficking of human beings
  • Apply existing knowledge to generate ideas and creative solutions in the international communities' response to state crimes, with a sense of responsibility and a commitment to ethical practice and social justice
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll consider who defines what is and isn’t acceptable, how those standards have changed over time, and how people have resisted the restrictions placed on them. You’ll examine notions of self-censorship and self-regulation, as well as ideas of control and agency as a basis for critically engaging with the notion of state power in different historical periods.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate a variety of sources and appraise different aspects of censorship, state power and control
  • Compare and critically reflect on different notions of human control and agency and the various ways that these operated in different locations under contrasting regimes
  • Differentiate between the historiographical approaches towards notions of censorship, state power and control
  • Communicate ideas and arguments effectively, in a range of different formats
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures/seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll learn how to apply forensic techniques and evaluate the value of different types of physical evidence. You’ll also develop your understanding of the criminal justice system across disciplines, and appreciate the value of a robust forensic investigation to the wider investigative process.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Justify the use of crime scene processing, management, and evidence recovery techniques
  • Compare and contrast methods of forensic analysis
  • Critically evaluate the value of forensic evidence types
  • Communicate the findings of forensic investigations to key stakeholders in the criminal justice system
  • Contextualise the holistic use of forensic evidence in collaboration with other investigative resources
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore what security means, and how security needs are being addressed, at different levels of analysis and policy implementation from the international, national and community dimensions right through to that of the individual citizen.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise disciplinary perspectives on the concept of security within a criminological framework
  • Critically discuss the drivers of societal risk and insecurity
  • Recognise the nature and impact of economic and political developments
  • Explain and assess the many forms of threat to the security of states, corporations and individuals
  • Identify and assess responses to security threats at the global, national, local, corporate and individual levels
  • Locate, interpret, question and summarise information from a number of different sources
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework project (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll use seven simple questions as the basis for understanding and learning: what is hate crime, how much of it is there, who is involved/affected, where is it occurring, when is it occurring, why is it occurring, and what can be done about it? The module gives you a holistic appreciation and understanding of the phenomenon commonly referred to as 'hate crime'.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject area
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to the subject area
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of social justice issues
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how your core criminological and psychology knowledge combine in relation to missing persons investigation and literature. You’ll examine real missing persons cases, and critically analyse how these cases have been dealt with in the criminal justice system and by society as a whole.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and differentiate the types and categories of missing person cases that are dealt with in the UK and elsewhere
  • Identify and discuss the role and impact of the agencies responding to or involved in dealing with missing persons incidents, including the media
  • Examine and interpret the overlap between missing person's cases and types of serious crime
  • Appraise and critique the appropriateness and effectiveness of responses by key agencies to missing persons incidents and identify areas for improvement
  • Apply relevant criminological and psychological theories to missing people, their families, responders, and offenders
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore issues such as mental health problems, violence, gangs and gender. You'll argue for the need for change in the criminal justice system to address issues for the creation of a more humane and effective system.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge of the principles and practices of penology
  • Engage creatively with the multi disciplinary basis of the subject area
  • Apply knowledge for the development of creative solutions to intractable problems
  • Engage in an ethical evaluation of the justifications for punishment
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine the history of the wider policing 'family' and agencies that have oversight of the police. You'll look at the role of the police, their organisational structure, and the challenges posed by the changing nature and complexity of crime.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Evaluate the history and sociology of policing organisations
  • Explain the role, organisation, and governance arrangements of policing in the UK
  • Analyse issues of trust and legitimacy within the police
  • Identify and analyse major challenges confronting policing agencies nationally and internationally
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour workshops
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine public and private organisations investigating economic crime, looking at the roles and techniques used by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), City of London Police (CoLP), National Crime Agency (NCA), and Europol as well as those in the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), Local Authorities and Trading Standards. You'll get presentations of first-hand accounts from representatives of these organisations on the complex nature of investigating economic crimes and examine companies with their own in-house provision and other entities such as FACT (the UK’s leading intellectual property protection organisation).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and recognise the varying disciplinary perspectives on the concept of the principles of economic crime investigation within criminological, legal, and economic frameworks
  • Familiarise yourself with the main types of organisations involved in investigating economic crime—including SFO, NCA and FCA
  • Identify the different modes of investigative techniques employed in investigating economic crime
  • Analyse information on the investigation techniques employed in real economic crime cases
  • Gather, retrieve, and analyse information from a variety of sources
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore significant themes and debates in the history of slavery in the Atlantic World. Themes include: the intersection of ideas of race, gender, and slavery; the inherent violence of the institutions of slavery, and the persistent forms of resistance by the enslaved; and the development of anti-slavery thought and practices, including revolutionary action and mass campaigning.

The module is framed by the idea of the Atlantic World: a space created by the peoples who inhabited the continents of Europe, Africa, and the Americas; a space shaped by the lives and labour of the enslaved; and a world in which a particularly brutal and exploitative form of racial slavery was developed and eventually destroyed.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore various core topics in the history of race and slavery in the Atlantic World
  • Evaluate the historiography of slavery and antislavery in the Atlantic world
  • Critically examine the nature and basis of primary evidence
  • Write effectively using appropriate academic norms and conventions
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll study how behaviours now considered private or medical such as sexual incontinency were formerly monitored and controlled, the role of religious ideas and the participation of neighbours,  and you'll examine changes to criminal justice from when corporal, capital punishment and torture were considered acceptable to the eighteenth-century 'bloody code', to the enlightenment ideas of punishment and modern policing. You’ll also explore the impact of urbanisation on patterns of crime and anxieties surrounding it and the use of criminal prosecution as a means of social control, in relation to enforcing gender-roles and controlling the poor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate a variety of sources relating to and appraise different aspects of the history of crime
  • Assess methods of social control used at different periods of time, and the extent to which these were challenged
  • Differentiate between different historiographical approaches and arguments in the history of crime
  • Review how legal records can be used as a primary source for the understanding of social history
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

This has led to various victim-centred reforms and a need for professionals and industry agencies to implement new policies and work with victims of crime. On this module you'll get an introduction to the historical and political factors behind this shift in focus as well as an introduction to victimology as an academic discipline. You'll examine theoretical perspectives and research in victimology, the impact of victim-centred reforms on professional practices and the role and rights of victims of crime.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Think independently, analytically and creatively about the subject area
  • Analyse and appraise new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information relevant to the subject area
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of social justice
  • Develop and further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also look at national and international law, the role of police wildlife crime officers, and investigation and forensic evidence.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the different types of wildlife crime and summarise environmental factors
  • Recognise and examine the importance of environmental justice and sustainability
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to environmental justice and wildlife crime
  • Interpret and assess new and existing knowledge
  • Demonstrate intellectual curiosity and identify further opportunities in the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop an holistic and fully rounded knowledge of youth crime and youth justice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about youth crime and youth justice
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to youth crime and youth justice
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of youth justice issues
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)
  • a practical exercise (20% of final mark)

Optional sandwich year

Optional modules

What you'll do

Your placement year will be assessed after a period of no less than 30 weeks, on a pass/fail basis.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on the skills needed in a placement environment
  • Identify and evaluate your learning experience and the relevance of this to future careers and professional development
  • Identify areas for improvement or further training in your professional development
  • Evaluate your success in meeting the objectives identified in your learning agreement
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1,125 hours on placement
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

Year 3

Core Modules

What you'll do

You'll look at how the development of contemporary criminological accounts departs from traditional criminological perspectives and turns our attention to the pleasures of acting criminally or in a deviant manner. You'll focus on these themes of pains and pleasures in a contemporary analysis of criminology.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate theoretical approaches to understand the nature, impact, and place of the discipline in contemporary society
  • Comprehensively critique the contributions of contemporary criminology to interpretations of late modern transgression and punishment
  • Critically appraise the significance of challenges posed by cultural transformations on criminology as a discipline
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 6 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll put together your own personal, independent research which can take many forms depending on the aims and focus of the dissertation/project.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design a viable dissertation/project proposal
  • Utilise a range of current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Deploy established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to the subject
  • Critically evaluate assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Manage and reflect on your learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience relevant to either the academic or workplace community
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 hours of project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 385 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 9,000-word dissertation (90% of final mark)

Optional Modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conduct a multidisciplinary theoretical analysis of terrorism studies, terrorism, terrorists and pathways to terrorism and political violence
  • Systematically compare and contrast differing forms of terrorism
  • Critically reflect on differing counter terrorist strategies and tactics, policies and practices
  • Locate, access and critically engage with digital information related to terrorist groups globally
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 168 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,500-word coursework reports (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how the use of incarceration reinforces social and structural inequalities. Following on from this you'll consider transformative possibilities where incarceration becomes obsolete, and the social & structural inequalities which sustain places of detention are eliminated.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Analyse the social instution of prisons in punitive cultures
  • Appraise the ways in which classism, racism, sexism, masculinity, are central to the formation, history and persistence of prisons
  • Conceptualize alternatives to the use of prison and viable strategies for social change
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word essay (75% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine the concepts of dangerousness and risk, and how sexual and violent offenders are risk assessed and managed. You'll develop your critical understanding and appreciation of dangerousness and public protection through analysis and debates including those from the USA, Canada and Australia.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is critical, reflective and questioning
  • Think independently and develop knowledge and comprehension of risk assessments, including the metrics of risk of harm and reoffending
  • Engage intellectually, analyse and appraise new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information about the subject area
  • Recognise and critically discuss the importance of public protection issues
  • Work independently and with others effectively
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 9 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 169 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word risk management plan report (40% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the diagnostic and risk assessment tools that inform decisions regarding high-risk offenders. You'll also discuss contemporary issues surrounding forensic psychology and mental health.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Identify psychological principles that inform interventions with mentally disordered offenders in secure environments
  • Locate and engage with mental health issues in forensic psychology
  • Evaluate the role of psychology in developing treatment pathways for mentally disordered offenders
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll advance your understanding of psychological theory and principles studied in your first and second years, and consider the relationship of theories to criminal justice issues. You’ll study core areas where psychology has had an influence on investigation, and topics such as cognitive interview and detecting deceit.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Locate and combine information relevant to the subject area
  • Critically consider applications of psychological theory to solve problems in a forensic setting
  • Communicate ideas effectively in written form
  • Develop a critical understanding of the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore how pathways to crime are influenced by gender, focusing on offending, victimisation, punishment, treatment, rehabilitation and our understanding of crime and the criminal.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse the importance of understanding crime from a gendered perspective
  • Evaluate the influence of gendered perspectives on our understanding of crime and criminology
  • Compare and contrast gendered pathways into crime
  • Critically analyse gendered responses to crime
  • Examine the impact of gender on professionals working in criminal justice agencies
  • Critically analyse the female experiences of the criminal justice system
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore eco-philosophy, before examining theory, perpetrators, victimology, and law and regulation. You’ll study the complexities of policing and investigation, and highlight the role of both environmental forensics and citizen activism.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise environmental criminology and other theoretical perspectives on 'green crime'
  • Critically analyse the nature, scale and range of perpetrators and victims surrounding environmental crime
  • Examine the role of environmental law and regulation
  • Assess the importance of environmental risk assessments
  • Examine the organisations engaged in the policing and investigation of environmental crime at a national and international level
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll get a detailed understanding of the role of the intelligence analyst, their techniques and methods, and the theoretical foundations of their profession. You'll develop a critical appreciation of the different forms, benefits and potential weaknesses of intelligence analysis.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the fundamentals of intelligence analysis in terms of the different practices, types and products
  • Develop an understanding of the role of the intelligence analyst and their role in an investigative team
  • Critically examine and demonstrate how strategic intelligence analysis helps inform policy and decision-making in public and private organisations
  • Appraise how intelligence analysis technologies and techniques can support investigations into forms of serious and organised crime
  • Critically examine and demonstrate how social network analysis represents a scientific alternative to conventional intelligence analysis
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop the basic knowledge needed to understand the management of investigations into serious and possible organised crime. You’ll develop an understanding of strategies and major incident procedures. You'll also look at the application of forensic science and of the legal and ethical parameters the police and criminal justice system operate in.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject
  • Analyse and evaluate both new and existing knowledge
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject matter
  • Critically analyse information from a variety of sources and develop an argument
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll look at topics such as poor police investigations and case construction, issues arising from court procedures, the use of 'junk science' and questionable expert witnesses. You’ll examine the major impact that forensic science advances have had on the detection and prevention of wrongful convictions, and review the aftermath following an overturned conviction.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically and reflectively assess the causes of miscarriages of justice
  • Critically analyse miscarriages of justice using a holistic and cross-disciplinary approach
  • Using a range of theoretical approaches, assess the impact that forensic science advances have had on the detection and prevention of miscarriages of justice
  • Critically examine the basic rights of suspects from the initial investigation and first trial to the appeals process and beyond, including the role of the Criminal Cases Review Commission
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine compliance systems, including how organisations must manage complex issues emerging from the rapidly changing legal and regulatory environment. You’ll then learn about specific compliance issues in the area of money laundering

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply your knowledge and understanding of core terms and concepts relating to economic explanation for law, organisation and compliance in the area of anti-money laundering (AML)
  • Apply the knowledge and understanding of the main AML legal and regulatory structures to new situations
  • Critically evaluate AML legal and regulatory structures and develop arguments while being aware of the limits of knowledge
  • Apply written communication skills and make use of library-based and community-based research opportunities
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop a deeper understanding of the legal and ethical parameters in which murder are investigated and critically examine the framework and complexities in the criminal justice system.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Evaluate the reasons why murder investigations fail in relation to policy and practical development
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Engage intellectually and critically with the subject matter
  • Analyse a variety of sources and develop an argument
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore models of engagement with victims and witnesses of crime in diverse communities. You'll also study the gathering and assessment of police intelligence, and its application to offences from anti-social behaviour to terrorism and organised crime.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Discuss national policing models of intelligence and decision-making
  • Articulate the principles of community policing
  • Apply intelligence approaches to policing
  • Evaluate the role of police in countering terrorist activities and other serious and organised crimes
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll debate the powers that legislation gives to Police Constables and other law enforcement professionals, and the necessity of holding them accountable to professional standards. You'll also examine ethical issues and professional skills in decision making, team working, conflict management and digital policing techniques.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Discuss the purpose of the police service
  • Understand the necessity for professional standards and values, and how this relates to the concept of policing by consent
  • Apply and evaluate core principles of ethics, equality, diversity and human rights in professional policing
  • Summarise strategies to develop resilience and maintain personal well-being within policing
  • Examine the application of law within policing
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-hour written exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to political science debates that focus on political ideologies of right-wing extremism. You’ll examine political parties, pressure groups and street movements such as the British Union of Fascists, the National Front, the British National Party and the ""counter-jihad"" English Defence League and Britain First.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise key debates from political science on the extreme right
  • Demonstrate detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the historical development and current position(s) of the extreme right
  • Critically analyse and evaluate contemporary criminological arguments on the extreme right
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll analyse employer expectations and apply your findings to refine your professional profile. You'll also prepare a job application pack, and take part in a mock interview as both a candidate and a recruiter and/or assessor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate your personal professional profile and relate it to the development of effective job application strategies
  • Research and critically evaluate employers' expectations of a candidates' skills, attributes and competences in different sector
  • Evaluate your scores from various Psychometric tests to prepare for an employment assessment
  • Professionally communicate the outcomes of your experience to potential employers by producing a CV, statement, video pitch and a mock and formal job interview
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word practical skills assessment (65% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to the emergence and development of social policy as an academic discipline with its roots in social reform movements and explore the development of systems of social welfare and control from the Poor Laws to the emergence of the '‘Welfare State' in the twentieth-century. You’ll also examine the ""wicked problems"" and how these influence or impact on crime, and look at topics including poverty and social exclusion, housing and homelessness, underemployment and unemployment, education, health, and other social welfare concerns.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Outline the academic relationship between the disciplines of criminology and social policy
  • Contextualise historic and contemporary systems of social welfare and how they can also be interpreted as forms of control
  • Critically evaluate the evidence on the relationship between crime and social problems
  • Critically appraise contemporary debates on the interplay between social justice and criminal justice, crime and inequality, and the criminalisation of social policy
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll build on your existing knowledge of crimes committed by the powerful, looking at contemporary case studies. You'll examine theories of state crime including security and political crimes, economic and environmental crime, and social and cultural crimes. You'll also explore the means of responding to these crimes as a state, as civil society, and as an individual actor.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Assess the relevance (or otherwise) of criminological theory to contemporary state criminality
  • Appraise the nature of contemporary state criminality
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of responses to state crime, and consider other responses
  • Take part in theoretical, ethical, and practical debates on state criminality
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 90-minute lectures
  • 12 x 90-minute seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll look at a variety of approaches to treatment and rehabilitation and the application of these approaches in criminal justice practice.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse concepts of treatment and rehabilitation towards people in the criminal justice system
  • Evaluate theoretical approaches to treatment and rehabilitation
  • Critically examine and apply theoretical debates around rehabilitation to criminal justice practice
  • Compare and contrast different approaches to rehabilitation
  • Effectively communicate research and theories related to the treatment and rehabilitation of specific offender groups and offending behaviours (domestic abuse, sexual offending, substance-related offending, youth crime, offending by women)
  • Critically analyse future directions for the treatment and rehabilitation of those in the criminal justice system
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 25-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

I love studying Criminology at Portsmouth because it’s so up to date with current research.

Abbey Campbell, BSc Hons Criminology and Criminal Justice student

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Group discussions
  • Practical workshops

Teaching staff include current and former practitioners who have worked in roles such as police officer, probation officer, private investigator and search and rescue worker.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • Coursework
  • Examinations
  • Presentations
  • Group projects
  • A dissertation or major project

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you're assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 18% by written exams, 7% by practical exams and 75% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 10% by practical exams and 90% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 8% by written exams, 13% by practical exams and 79% by coursework

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

In 2021/22, we're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Criminology and Criminal Justice degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • Teaching block 1 – early October to January
  • Assessment period 1 – late January to early February
  • Teaching block 2 – February to May
  • Assessment period 2 – May to June

Extra learning support

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

In 2021/22, we're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

Learning development tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • Understanding and using assignment feedback
  • Managing your time and workload
  • Revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Since graduating from this course, I've worked for Surrey Police, the Metropolitan Police and Hampshire Police, and now I'm training as a detective. Having visited a number of other universities, it's clear that Portsmouth is committed to leading the way in Criminology.

Paul Sammons , BSc Hons Criminology and Criminal Justice Studies student

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2021 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £15,500 a year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll need to pay additional costs of £50–£1000 to cover travel, accommodation or subsistence if you take a placement abroad. The amount you’ll pay will vary, depending on the location and length of your stay.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2021, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – M930
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Subjects needed for criminology

You don't need to study specific subjects at school or college to do this criminology and criminal justice degree course. But you may find it useful to have covered these subjects in your previous studies:

  • Criminology
  • Law
  • Sociology
  • Psychology
  • Geography
  • Religious studies
  • Economics
  • History
  • Biology
  • Computing

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

Preparing for this degree

You can prepare for this degree by staying informed about current working practices and issues affecting the sector.

When you start the course, you'll have access to the latest journal articles and research. Texts you might want to explore beforehand include: 

Criminology

  • Carrabine, E. et al (2020). Criminology: A Sociological Introduction. Routledge.
  • Jones, S. (2017). Criminology. Oxford University Press.
  • Newburn, T. (2017). Criminology. Routledge.
  • Tierney, J. (2009). Criminology: Theory and Context. Routledge
  • Walklate, S. (2016). Criminology: The Basics. Routledge.

Criminal Justice

  • Joyce, P. (2017). Criminal Justice: An Introduction. Routledge.
  • Joyce, P. (2018). Criminology and Criminal Justice: A Study Guide. Routledge.
  • Harding, J., Davies, P., and Mair, G. (2017). An Introduction to Criminal Justice. SAGE.
  • O’Brien, F., Collie, C., & Giles, S. (2021, January 20). Lockdown 3: stricter rules could lead to more vulnerable people going missing. The Conversation.

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